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Education

Education Year In Review: Did We Learn Anything in 2010?

NPR education reporters Larry Abramson and Claudio Sanchez discuss the past year in education — and what's to come in 2011. Among stories to look out for in the new year are the political repercussions from failure to pass the DREAM act, the slow start for Race to the Top (President Obama's version of No Child Left Behind) and funding cuts in local school districts.

Electronic GED Testing For Georgians

Change is coming to the GED program. Georgia will be among the first states in the country where the high school equivalency test will be offered electronically.

State Boosts Virtual Charter School Funding

Virtual charter schools are getting a financial boost in the state. And parents who choose the cyber route to educate their kids will have more options next year.

'Freedom Riders': Documentary Retraces Bus Rides To End Segregation

The film, "Freedom Riders," recounts the 1961 crusade by daring young activists intent on ending segregated travel on interstate buses in the Deep South. The American Experience film, set to air May 16 on PBS, has been generating buzz on the film festival circuit ever since its showing at Sundance in January.

Ga. District Proposes Self-Directed Programs for High Schools

Traditional high schools are working to meet the needs of a new breed of students—those graduating from the county's schools of choice that focus on self-direction.

HOPE Book Allowance Cut In Half

Beginning July 1, a book allowance that helps students pay for textbooks will be cut in half, the Georgia Student Finance Commission said.

Cyber School Funding Boosted

More cyber schools are likely on the way for Georgia. The state’s Charter Schools Commission Thursday agreed to boost cyber school funding—from an amount of $3,400, to $5,800 per student.

Community Opposes MCG Road Closure

The Medical College of Georgia is being criticized for wanting to convert part of a road running through its campus to a pedestrian only way. The road also runs through a predominantly African American neighborhood and residents there aren’t happy

Students Screen Homeless For Mental Illness

Georgia is in the process of reforming its mental health system after a federal lawsuit challenged poor conditions in state psychiatric hospitals. But students from the Medical College of Georgia are hoping to bring about changes at the street level by helping homeless people deal with mental illness before ending up in a state hospital.

UGA Gets $2M Federal Grant

The University of Georgia has received a $2 million grant to work on designing a new computer that can more rapidly solve problems in such fields as cryptography, mathematics and physics.

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