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Politics

State Legislators Begin Final 10 Days of Session

State legislators on Monday embark on the final 10 days of this year’s legislative session. The House and Senate will spend this week reviewing the bills that have already passed one chamber.

Census Details Today's Georgia

Newly released census data showed that most of Georgia's 1.5 million increase in population came in metro Atlanta and north Georgia. But rural population is shrinking in southwest Georgia. Hispanics grew to nearly 9 percent of the state’s population and African-Americans grew to 31 percent.

Forecasting Session's Final 10 Days

With Wednesday's long legislative day known as Crossover Day now past, state lawmakers roll-up their sleeves for the final 10 working days of the 40-day General Assembly.

Trauma Care Among Dead Bills

Many bills ended their run this Wednesday as lawmakers worked well into the evening to meet their deadline.

Airline Tax Breaks OK'd by House

Members of the House were busy on Wednesday handling bills before the midnight deadline. The bills included, among others, airline tax breaks and health care.

Alcohol, Gun Bills Pass Senate

The Senate passed numerous bills on Wednesday including a bill that will let communities legalize Sunday alcohol sales.

Senate Passes Abortion Lawsuit Bill

Women who seek abortions would be able to sue a clinic if it violates state regulations under a bill the state Senate passed Wednesday.

State Senate OKs Guns in Church

The state Senate Wednesday overwhelmingly passed a bill to allow licensed gun owners to carry weapons in church.

Gov. Deal Supports Alternative Sentencing

The House voted to create a panel to study the state's tough sentencing laws. Georgia spends about $1 billion a year on corrections. It has one of the highest incarceration rates in the nation.

Proposed Bill to Send 9-1-1 Fees Back to Local Communities

A bill that would send 9-1-1 fees back to local communities has a chance to pass this legislative session. In 2009, the state estimated the fees totaled nearly $16 million dollars a year.

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